Cinnamon Nutrition Label

Cinnamon Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 100.00g
% Daily Value*
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Energy -
0%
Carbohydrates -
0%
Sugars -
Starch -
Sucrose -
Maltose -
Fructose -
Galactose -
Glucose -
Protein -
0%
Fat -
0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated -
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated cis -
Fatty acids, total saturated -
Cholesterol (gc) -
Sterols -
Iron -
0%
Vitamin d -
0%
Calcium -
0%
Chromium -
0%
Sodium -
0%
Iodine -
0%
Copper -
0%
Salt -
0%
Selenium -
0%
Vitamin e alphatocopherol -
0%
Zinc -
0%
Vitamin c (ascorbic acid) -
0%
Vitamin b-12 (cobalamin) -
0%
Vitamin a retinol activity equivalents -
0%
Thiamin (vitamin b1) -
0%
Riboflavine (vitamin b2) -
0%
Vitamin b6 pyridoxine (hydrochloride) -
0%
Manganese -
0%
Magnesium -
0%
Potassium -
0%
Fluoride -
0%
Phosphorus -
0%
Vitamin k -
0%
Fibre, total -
0%
Fibre, dietary -
0%
Niacin equivalents, total -
0%
Molybdenum -
0%
Folate -
0%
Alcohol -
0%
Polyols -
0%
Water -
0%

*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet.

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Common Questions about Cinnamon

What is Cinnamon?

Cinnamon is a spice derived from the inner bark of trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. It is commonly used in both sweet and savory dishes, as well as in beverages. Cinnamon has a warm, sweet flavor and is known for its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

What are the health benefits of cinnamon?

Cinnamon is rich in antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties. It may help lower blood sugar levels, reduce the risk of heart disease, and improve gut health. Some studies also suggest that it has anti-cancer effects and may protect against neurodegenerative diseases.

What are the health risks associated with cinnamon?

Cinnamon is generally safe when consumed in food amounts or used in cooking. However, consuming large amounts of cinnamon supplements may carry some health risks, such as potential liver damage due to the compound coumarin. It's important to use cinnamon in moderation and consult with a healthcare professional, especially if you have liver disease or are taking medications that may interact with cinnamon.

How much cinnamon should I consume per day?

The recommended daily intake of cinnamon is about 0.5 to 2 teaspoons (2-10 grams). Consuming excessive amounts of cinnamon can be harmful due to the presence of coumarin, so it's best to stick to moderate amounts for flavoring and health benefits.

Cinnamon Allergies

Cinnamon allergies are not common, but they can occur. Some people may experience allergic reactions to cinnamon, which can include symptoms like skin rashes, difficulty breathing, or digestive issues. If you suspect you have a cinnamon allergy, it's important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and guidance on managing your allergy.

Cinnamon Calorie Breakdown

The ratio of macro elements (protein, fat, carbs) in Cinnamon

Protein Amino Acids Profile

The ratio of amino acids in Cinnamon. See full profile

Tryptophan 1%
Cystine 2%
Methionine 2%
Histidine 3%
Threonine 4%
Tyrosine 4%
Phenylalanine 4%
Isoleucine 4%
Alanine 5%
Arginine 5%
Glycine 6%
Serine 6%
Valine 6%
Lysine 7%
Leucine 7%
Glutamic acid 10%
Proline 12%
Aspartic acid 12%

Component Breakdown for Cinnamon

Macro
Minerals
Vitamins
Amino acids
Carbo-hydrate
Data for Amino Acids is mapped from an external database. Use with caution only for informational purposes. Source: USDA

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