Baking powder Nutrition Label

Baking powder Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 100.00g
% Daily Value*
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Energy 176kcal (735 kj)
37%
Carbohydrates 37.80g
15%
Sugars 0.00g
Starch 37.80g
Sucrose 0.00g
Maltose 0.00g
Fructose 0.00g
Galactose -
Glucose 0.00g
Protein 5.20g
4%
Fat 0.00g
0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated 0.00g
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated cis 0.00g
Fatty acids, total saturated 0.00g
Cholesterol (gc) 0.00mg
Sterols 0.00mg
Iron 0.00mg
0%
Vitamin d 0.00ug
0%
Calcium 11,300.00mg
1,130%
Chromium -
0%
Sodium 11,800.00mg
787%
Iodine 0.00ug
0%
Copper 0.00mg
0%
Salt 30,066.40mg
1,307%
Selenium 0.00ug
0%
Vitamin e alphatocopherol 0.00mg
0%
Zinc 2.80mg
35%
Vitamin c (ascorbic acid) 0.00mg
0%
Vitamin b-12 (cobalamin) 0.00ug
0%
Vitamin a retinol activity equivalents 0.00ug
0%
Thiamin (vitamin b1) 0.00mg
0%
Riboflavine (vitamin b2) 0.00mg
0%
Vitamin b6 pyridoxine (hydrochloride) 0.00mg
0%
Manganese -
0%
Magnesium 9.00mg
3%
Potassium 49.00mg
2%
Fluoride -
0%
Phosphorus 8,400.00mg
1,200%
Vitamin k 0.00ug
0%
Fibre, total 0.50g
0%
Fibre, dietary 0.50g
2%
Niacin equivalents, total 0.00mg
0%
Molybdenum -
0%
Folate 0.00ug
0%
Alcohol 0.00g
0%
Polyols -
0%
Water 6.30g
0%

*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet.

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Common Questions about Baking powder

What is Baking Powder?

Baking powder is a leavening agent used in baking to help baked goods rise. It typically contains a combination of an acid (such as cream of tartar) and a base (such as baking soda) along with a filler, such as cornstarch. When mixed with liquid and exposed to heat, it releases carbon dioxide gas, which causes dough or batter to rise and gives baked goods a light, fluffy texture.

What are the health benefits of baking powder?

Baking powder does not offer significant health benefits as it is primarily used as a leavening agent in baking to help baked goods rise. It typically contains sodium bicarbonate and an acid, which reacts to produce carbon dioxide gas, causing dough or batter to rise. While it is not a significant source of nutrients, it can help create light and fluffy texture in baked goods.

What are the health risks of baking powder?

Baking powder is generally safe for consumption in small amounts. However, consuming large quantities of baking powder can lead to a high intake of sodium, which can contribute to high blood pressure and other health conditions. Additionally, some individuals may be sensitive to the other ingredients in baking powder, such as aluminum, and may experience adverse reactions. It's important to use baking powder in moderation and to be mindful of your overall sodium intake from all sources.

How much baking powder should I eat per day?

It is not recommended to eat baking powder as a standalone food item. Baking powder is typically used as a leavening agent in baking and should be used in accordance with recipes. Consuming large amounts of baking powder can result in excess sodium intake and potential digestive issues.

Baking powder Allergies

Baking powder typically contains cornstarch, which may cause allergic reactions in individuals with corn allergies. It's important to carefully read the ingredient labels and choose a baking powder that is specifically labeled as corn-free if you have a corn allergy. Additionally, some individuals may be sensitive to the aluminum found in certain baking powders, so opting for aluminum-free varieties can be beneficial.

Baking powder Calorie Breakdown

The ratio of macro elements (protein, fat, carbs) in Baking powder

Fat 0%
Carbohydrates 88%
Protein 12%

Component Breakdown for Baking powder

Macro
Minerals
Vitamins
Amino acids
Carbo-hydrate
Data for Amino Acids is mapped from an external database. Use with caution only for informational purposes. Source: USDA

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