Mineral water, sweetened with fructose Nutrition Label

Mineral water, sweetened with fructose Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 100.00g
% Daily Value*
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Energy 11kcal (48 kj)
2%
Carbohydrates 2.80g
1%
Sugars 2.80g
Starch 0.00g
Sucrose 0.00g
Maltose 0.00g
Fructose 2.80g
Galactose 0.00g
Glucose 0.00g
Protein 0.00g
0%
Fat 0.00g
0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated 0.00g
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated cis 0.00g
Fatty acids, total saturated 0.00g
Cholesterol (gc) 0.00mg
Sterols 0.00mg
Iron 0.01mg
0%
Vitamin d 0.00ug
0%
Calcium 4.70mg
0%
Chromium 0.10ug
0%
Sodium 45.00mg
3%
Iodine 1.00ug
1%
Copper 0.00mg
0%
Salt 114.66mg
5%
Selenium 0.05ug
0%
Vitamin e alphatocopherol 0.00mg
0%
Zinc 0.01mg
0%
Vitamin c (ascorbic acid) 0.00mg
0%
Vitamin b-12 (cobalamin) 0.00ug
0%
Vitamin a retinol activity equivalents 0.00ug
0%
Thiamin (vitamin b1) 0.00mg
0%
Riboflavine (vitamin b2) 0.00mg
0%
Vitamin b6 pyridoxine (hydrochloride) 0.00mg
0%
Manganese 0.00mg
0%
Magnesium 7.23mg
2%
Potassium 13.50mg
1%
Fluoride 0.00mg
0%
Phosphorus 0.10mg
0%
Vitamin k 0.00ug
0%
Fibre, total 0.00g
0%
Fibre, dietary 0.00g
0%
Niacin equivalents, total 0.00mg
0%
Molybdenum 0.00mg
0%
Folate 0.00ug
0%
Alcohol 0.00g
0%
Polyols 0.00g
0%
Water 96.90g
3%

*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet.

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Common Questions about Mineral water, sweetened with fructose

What is mineral water sweetened with fructose?

Mineral water sweetened with fructose is mineral water that has been flavored with the sweetener fructose. It is a carbonated beverage that contains natural minerals and is often marketed as a healthier alternative to regular sodas. However, it is important to consume sweetened mineral water in moderation due to the added fructose content, which can contribute to excess calorie intake.

What are the health benefits of mineral water sweetened with fructose?

While mineral water provides hydration and essential minerals, sweetening it with fructose can contribute to added sugar intake. It's important to be mindful of consuming excessive added sugars, as they can lead to health issues such as weight gain and tooth decay. Opting for plain mineral water without added sweeteners is a healthier choice for hydration.

Mineral water, sweetened with fructose Health Risks

While mineral water itself is a healthy choice, it's important to be mindful of added sweeteners like fructose. Excessive consumption of fructose, especially in liquid form, can contribute to weight gain, increase the risk of developing metabolic disorders, and can impact heart health. It's advisable to opt for unsweetened mineral water to avoid potential health risks associated with added sugars.

How much Mineral water, sweetened with fructose should I consume per day?

It is recommended to consume sweetened mineral water in moderation, as excess fructose intake can contribute to health issues such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. The American Heart Association suggests limiting added sugars to 6 teaspoons (25 grams) for women and 9 teaspoons (38 grams) for men per day. It's important to check the nutrition label and be mindful of overall sugar intake from all sources throughout the day.

Mineral water, sweetened with fructose Allergies

Mineral water sweetened with fructose can trigger allergies in some individuals, particularly those with fructose malabsorption or a sensitivity to high-fructose corn syrup. Symptoms can include bloating, gas, and abdominal discomfort. It's important for individuals with known allergies or sensitivities to fructose to carefully read food labels and choose products accordingly.

Mineral water, sweetened with fructose Calorie Breakdown

The ratio of macro elements (protein, fat, carbs) in Mineral water, sweetened with fructose

Fat 0%
Carbohydrates 100%
Protein 0%

Component Breakdown for Mineral water, sweetened with fructose

Macro
Minerals
Vitamins
Amino acids
Carbo-hydrate
Data for Amino Acids is mapped from an external database. Use with caution only for informational purposes. Source: USDA

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